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J Nucl Med. 2012; 53 (Supplement 1):2119
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General Clinical Specialties

MTA II: Gastroenterology Posters

F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography of colonic anastomosis: A possibility to detect anastomotic leakage? A pilot study

Pascal Teeuwen1, Lioe-Fee de Geus-Oei2, Thijs Hendriks1, Harry van Goor1, Andre Bremers1, Wim Oyen2 and Robert Bleichrodt1

1 Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, Netherlands 2 Nuclear Medicine, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, Netherlands

Abstract No. 2119

Objectives: F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) may be a promising imaging technique to detect anastomotic bowel leak. FDG uptake is increased in inflammatory processes with granulocyte and macrophage activity, e.g. abdominal abscess. The aim of this study was to assess postoperative FDG uptake in colonic and colorectal anastomosis in patients without suspicion of active infection or anastomotic leakage.

Methods: Design of a prospective observational pilot study in order to assess normal FDG uptake in the anastomosis after colonic or colorectal resection. Patients older than 17 years of age undergoing elective colorectal surgery with primary anastomosis were included. All included patients underwent FDG-PET of the abdomen that was performed 2-6 days postoperatively.

Results: Thirty-six patients met the criteria of inclusion. Postoperative PET showed absent or negligible FDG- uptake in 17 patients and in 14 there was normal physiological bowel uptake. Only one patient had increased FDG uptake. None of the patients developed a clinical relevant anastomotic leakage within the first 30 days after surgery. Of the four included patients not scanned, one was operated for anastomotic leakage.

Conclusions: The results of the present study show that FDG uptake in colonic or colorectal anastomosis is low or normal within the first 6 days after surgery in patients not experiencing a clinical relevant anastomotic leakage. Therefore, this technique might be useful in further research to evaluate the value of FDG-PET in the detection of anastomotic leakage in an early stage postoperatively





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Right arrow Articles by Teeuwen, P.
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