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J Nucl Med. 2011; 52 (Supplement 1):2084
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Instrumentation & Data Analysis: Data Analysis & Management

Data Analysis and Management Posters

A non-invasive arterial blood sampling method to obtain input function in rat

Etienne Croteau1, Eric Poulin1, Sébastien Tremblay1, Veronique Dumulon-Perreault1, Suzanne Gascon1, Francois Benard2, Martin Lepage1 and Roger Lecomte1

1 1Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiobiology, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke Molecular Imaging Center, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada 2 Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Abstract No. 2084

Objectives: Kinetic modeling of small animal dynamic PET data requires the radiotracer input function (IF). Arterial blood sampling is the gold standard for IF determination, but this often requires invasive surgical procedures which are inappropriate for follow-up studies. One alternative to this problem would be to draw blood, either manually or using an automatic microvolumetric blood counter, from a needle placed non-invasively in the tail artery.

Methods: Animal experiments were conducted in male Fischer rats (280 ± 60 g). One group (n=3) was used to correlate automatic against manual sampling from both canula in the femoral arteries. Two more groups of rats were used to assess manual (n=5) and automatic (n=5) blood sampling from the tail artery. Each group was injected through a caudal vein with 25 MBq of FDG and a 45 minutes list mode PET data set was acquired. The myocardial metabolic rate of glucose (MMRG) was obtained using a PATLAK graphical analysis and a three compartment model.

Results: Manual and automatic IFs derived simultaneously from the femoral arteries yielded similar blood curves (paired T-test p=0.11). Similar results were also observed when drawing blood manually or with the microvolumetric counter from the tail artery (unpaired T-test p=0.55). However, IFs derived from the femoral and caudal arteries were different, yielding MMRG values of 13.6 ± 4.9 vs 27.1 ± 8.7 µmol/100 g/min, respectively. Further studies are underway to compare both sampling sites simultaneously since the physiological state of the animals could explain this discrepancy.

Conclusions: Non-invasive tail artery blood sampling was demonstrated to obtain IF with minimal impact on animal physiological integrity. This method would be appropriate for repeated follow up studies in the same animal, as it is often required for therapy assessment of cancer or heart disease models





This Article
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Right arrow Email this article to a friend
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Right arrow Alert me to new issues of the journal
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Google Scholar
Right arrow Articles by Croteau, E.
Right arrow Articles by Lecomte, R.
PubMed
Right arrow Articles by Croteau, E.
Right arrow Articles by Lecomte, R.